Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Program Type: Face-to-Face
Program Level: Degrees, Certificates
Department: Business and Entrepreneurship
Institute: Advanced Manufacturing & Logistics
College: NLC

Logistics is the movement of supplies, material, and people from one place to another to satisfy a corporate and consumer requirement. It includes inventory management, quality control, purchasing, operations management, and much more. All businesses rely on logistics professionals to keep their inventory moving.

Logistics and Supply Chain Management is one of the 50 fastest-growing career fields, according to the U.S. News and World Report. 

Program Highlights

  • Logistics Industry Day brings students face to face with logistics industry companies.
  • Custom Brokerage course opens up a new world of import and export trade regulations.
  • Supply chain simulations that expose students to challenges of product distribution.
  • An internship with a local company allows you to apply classroom learning to the real world.
 

Degree Offered

A.A.S, Logistics & Supply Chain  Management

 

Information about Logistics

Tomorrow’s CEOs Will Come from an Unlikely Place: The Supply Chain

As the operational dynamics of the supply chain become top-of-mind in this age of instant gratification, businesses are at an existential crossroads. Their so-called “operators” are their secret weapon to maintaining a competitive edge. Given this environment, it’s clear that supply chain professionals are poised to become the most powerful executives in the world, overseeing the heart and soul of global commerce and transforming the way companies run.

https://fortune.com/2018/12/11/ceo-supply-chain/

How a Background in Supply Chain Can Set You on the Path to CEO

Better supply chain management means better businesses, and better businesses make for a better world.

April 2021

To the obvious extent that supply chain management is a way to not just maintain a business, but to guide and grow it, leadership within organizations can benefit from looking closely at what they are doing to attract top supply chain talent and include that talent in executive capacities. Previous generations of industry required little more than purchasers; today, thanks to the rise of technology and globalization, success is built on a much more elaborate approach to procurement.

For those who aspire to lead or influence the future of business -- whether employees, students, educators, or others -- the way forward is to embrace the concepts above, spread them far and wide, and leverage them for individual and organizational benefit. Better supply chain management means better businesses, and better businesses make for a better world. 

Link to Article

 

Career Areas & Employment Positions

  • Transportation - Traffic or Freight Manager, Dispatch Supervisor, or Fleet Manager: $55,723 to $100,902 National Average Median
  • Warehousing/Distribution - Warehouse or Distribution Center Operations Manager: $62,998 to $99,410 National Average Median
  • International Logistics -Customs Agent, Logistics Analyst, Import/ Export Supervisor: $58,137 to $102,600 National Average Median
  • Manufacturing - Production Manager, Operations Supervisor or Logistics Engineer: $42,500 to $115,100 National Average Median
  • Purchasing - Purchasing Manager, Customer Service Supervisor, Finance Director: $62,804 to $90,142 National Average Median
Contact Info

Dr. Keith Collins
kcollins65@alamo.edu

In the past few years, there have been more examples of Supply Chain professionals stepping not just into the C-suite, but into the coveted Chief Executive position itself.

Among the more prominent supply chain leaders who’ve made it to the top slot, we can count Tim Cook of Apple, Mary Barra of General Motors, and Brian Krzanich of Intel. More recently we’ve seen Fabian Garcia, formerly of Colgate Palmolive, tapped to take over at Revlon and John Hendrickson recently promoted to CEO of Perrigo.

- By Kevin O’Marah, Forbes Magazine