Jessica's Project: Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy Prevention

July 17, 2018

Public Information Officer

ST. PHILIP'S COLLEGE STUDENT EXPERTISE, EXPERIENCE WITH COMPUTERIZED MANNEQUIN BABIES ENHANCES THE COLLEGE'S LATEST TEEN AND UNPLANNED PREGNANCY PREVENTION EVENT

A unique teen pregnancy prevention awareness project at St. Philip's College that normally serves potentially at-risk youth during summers was oriented this year to strengthening 130 of the college's health and biosciences students.

The lessons learned this summer will be applied to serve youth in an event forecast for the upcoming school year as part of the classroom series known as Jessica's Project. Those youth will encounter St. Philip's College students of health and biosciences, many of whom traditionally perfect their skills in on-campus human patient simulation labs and off-campus through clinical work as pre-professionals with actual patients who are clients at medical businesses large and small in one of the nation's 10 largest cities.

Over the years, some of the students have delivered presentations that feature human patient simulation during the summer program that is forecast to debut with similar content sometime during the fall or spring of the 2018-2019 academic year at the 120-year-old college, according to Dr. Solomon Nfor, college biotechnology program coordinator and organizer for the classroom series.

Kaylee Anderson, Nancy Figueroa, Jacqueline Robles and Michelle Bobb are level three St. Philip's College vocational nursing students who graduate in August with college-level medical knowledge and human patient simulation skill sets to share from their college lab experiences. 

Combined, the four have also completed or are currently completing clinical rotations at such San Antonio businesses as Meridian Care, Normandy Terrace, St. Paul Lutheran Daycare, San Pedro Manor, Regent Care and University Health System's Robert B. Green Campus. 

In team presentations, Anderson, Figueroa, Robles and Bobb took turns showing a training aid---a robotic baby with fully transparent skull---to health and biosciences colleagues who attended the half-day of multidisciplinary professional development with the project on June 28 in the college's Campus Center building in San Antonio's Denver Heights neighborhood. To safely inform students on the impact of premature pregnancies, fetal alcohol baby syndrome, drug affected baby syndrome and shaken baby syndrome were each demonstrated by a mix of nursing students and faculty members using computerized mannequins controlled by a St. Philip's College Dr. Frank Bryant, Jr., Patient Simulation Center and Nursing Laboratories team.

"We're showing four quadrants of the brain in a child to demonstrate the dangers of shaken baby syndrome," Anderson, a 2012 Southside High School alumna, said while handling one of the robotic training aids.

"Even the smallest shaking causes trauma to the brain, leading to lifelong impairments, said Figueroa, a 2015 Seguin High School alumna. "Take a break, don't shake," Figueroa advised.

According to the June 28 online reports  Robotic baby demonstration teaches parents effects of abuse  by SBG San Antonio reporter Ariana Lubelli for television stations KABB and WOAI, " Computerized mannequins at St. Philip's College show how parental abuse can directly affect a baby's brain… "Even the smallest little bit of shaking, it damages the brain and it lights up to show where the trauma would be to the brain," said student Nancy Figuerra as she demonstrated how the robotic baby works."

Between the robotic demonstrations, Bobb expressed excitement about her clinical experience with University Health System's Robert B. Green Campus that has grown from its 101-year-old origins as a World War One era charity hospital where Saint and college President Emeritus Artemisia Bowden is credited with being primarily responsible for the introduction of a Black nursing unit---into San Antonio's largest outpatient center---and a place of reference in 2018 for such students as Anderson, Figueroa, Robles and Bobb.

"The clinical experience at the Green was informative," said Bobb. "I got to work on OB/GYN stress testing, and I got to see fetal heartbeats. I viewed the situations babies and parents were put in," Bobb concluded.

Read the news reports online here and here.

For details on attending future Jessica's Project events, contact Nfor at 210-486-2754 or snfor@alamo.edu.

CAPTIONS:

01-02---One highlight of the Summer 2018 classroom series at St. Philip's College known as Jessica's Project was a training aid---a robotic baby with fully transparent skull---showing four quadrants of the brain in a child to demonstrate the dangers of shaken baby syndrome in a teen pregnancy prevention awareness project presentation co-led by (from left) level three St. Philip's College vocational nursing students Kaylee Anderson and Nancy Figueroa. The event for 130 of the college's vocational nursing and natural science students took place June 28 in the college's Campus Center building in San Antonio's Denver Heights neighborhood. (SPC Photos by Julysa Sosa)

 

03---One key component of the Summer 2018 classroom series at St. Philip's College known as Jessica's Project was a training aid---a robotic baby with fully transparent skull---showing four quadrants of the brain in a child to demonstrate the dangers of shaken baby syndrome in a series of teen pregnancy prevention awareness project presentations co-led by such level three St. Philip's College vocational nursing students as Kaylee Anderson (partially pictured at left) and Nancy Figueroa (fully pictured at right). The event for 130 of the college's vocational nursing and natural science students took place June 28 in the college's Campus Center building in San Antonio's Denver Heights neighborhood. (SPC Photo by Julysa Sosa)

 

04---A student listens as the Summer 2018 classroom series at St. Philip's College known as Jessica's Project conveys the dangers of shaken baby syndrome in a teen pregnancy prevention awareness project presentation using computerized mannequin babies as training aids. The event for 130 of the college's vocational nursing and natural science students took place June 28 in the college's Campus Center building in San Antonio's Denver Heights neighborhood. (SPC Photo by Julysa Sosa)